Websites Protest SOPA and PIPA with Major Site Changes

Websites Protest SOPA and PIPA

Today, January 18, 2012, marks the day that the Internet and websites protest against “Stop Online Piracy Act” (SOPA) and “Protect IP” (PIPA) have literally shut down (or dramatically changed) some major websites. These two bills are said to provide broad mechanisms for enforcement of copyright. This would limit innovation and threaten the survival of websites with content that users have submitted. This could profoundly change the whole Internet. This is the largest online protest ever.

Some notable websites protest SOPA with changes to their Website

The almighty Google has not actually shut down (God forbid) but they have blacked out their logo and put a link on their homepage that says: Tell Congress: Please don’t censor the web!

Craigslist has joined the bandwagon by making their landing page black saying “Imagine a world without craigslist, Google, Wikipedia…80 Members of Congress are in their sway, 30 against, the rest undecided or undeclared… PS:  corporate paymasters, KEEP THOSE CLAMMY HANDS OFF THE INTERNET! They have a link below that will take you to the actual craigslist page but this is still big in raising awareness.

Namecheap.com, a hosting and domain website has also made a landing page about SOPA. Their site now says “Stop Censorship on the Internet. We have blacked out our site in protest of SOPA and PIPA bills, currently being considered in the US House and Senate. If either one passes, the internet as we know it could be destroyed forever.” You can enter their website from the landing page but another awareness raising attempt to stop SOPA and PIPA.

Wikipedia Closes Shop in Protest of SOPA and PIPA

Now this is a big one! Just about any time you search for something a Wikipedia page is at the top of the list. When you click on any link to get to their website you will now see this:

Imagine a World
Without Free Knowledge

For over a decade, we have spent millions of hours building the largest encyclopedia in human history. Right now, the U.S. Congress is considering legislation that could fatally damage the free and open Internet. For 24 hours, to raise awareness, we are blacking out Wikipedia. Learn more.

Contact your representatives.

You can enter your zip code and be taken to a page that gives you all the information you need to contact your elected officials.

The whole SOPA and PIPA debacle started back in May of 2011 when the Protect IP Act and the Commercial Felony Streaming Act (Bieber bill) was introduced in the Senate. The Protect IP Act passed in the Senate Judiciary Committee by unanimous voice vote. The debate has been hot and heavy ever since. The fate is not yet determined.

The Internet and its many users have let their voice be heard. Websites protest SOPA and PIPA to make an impact on the future of the Internet.

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Elizabeth Crane

Elizabeth Crane grew up not wearing a helmet, drinking from the hose and not wearing a seat belt. She managed to survive and now spends her time developing websites, drinking coffee, and eating chocolate.

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